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The Last Thing Mom Asked

The realities of dying of lung cancer, by Sarah Lyall, describing the horrors of her mother’s final days, in the New York Times on August 31, 2018.  “Gradually, the illness took hold, the inevitable became less abstract and the jokes stopped.  Mom had vivid dreams of death so awful that she could not bring herself to describe them.  She became too weak to leave her bed, more of her independence seeping out each day like air from a balloon.  Her world close in…Lung cancer is a frightening illness.  In its final stages, it can make you feel as though you’re drowning, or suffocating.  A formidable pharmacological stew of medications can help to suppress the symptoms, but no pill can take away the pain of waking up each day and remembering all over again that you are about to die.”

Nothing could be clearer about why we need aid in dying to be legal.  The only person who should make the decision as to how much suffering is tolerable, is the person doing the suffering.

Here’s the full text and and here are letters responding especially a profound one from Betty Rollin, author of the book “Last Wish”.

 

2018-10-07T11:02:53+00:00October 1st, 2018|